Is addiction a disease?

Discussion in 'Debate' started by bud, Oct 13, 2016.

  1. bud

    bud yikes :( BoonForums Manager

    Messages:
    780
    Likes:
    544
    Local Time:
    2:15 AM
    Boon:
  2. bud
  3. I was on the phone with my friend. Him and I had a disagreement about addiction. I believe it is a disease and many studies show that it is. This topic is a sensitive topic for me and most people but I'm excited to hear your opinions, that's why I made this debate. I don't normally make debate threads just participate in them.

    Anyway,
    Do you think addiction is a disease?
     
    gab likes this.
  4. cuddle

    cuddle cuddle bean Subscriber

    Messages:
    801
    Likes:
    162
    Local Time:
    2:15 AM
    Boon:
  5. cuddle
  6. Snog:
  7. humbled
  8. I feel like it's more of a disorder than a disease. I'm not certified or anything but from what I've learned about how the brain works addiction comes from the ""high"" you feel after preforming your "addiction".. so the brain is trained on that positive reaction from that.. but yeah I guess it just depends on what the definition of "disease" is rn bc to me rn a disease is defined as something causing something else to not function properly while a disorder is something just not functioning properly if you get what I mean?? Aaa that's confusing
     
    Matt, bud and gab like this.
  9. Millenia

    Millenia Muff Diver Member

    Messages:
    101
    Likes:
    109
    Local Time:
    2:15 AM
    Boon:
  10. Millenia
  11. Addiction is not a disease, it's more of a habit that grows n grows and u really can't help yourself. Once you become addicted to something it's like you haven't had enough of it, you like it, it makes you feel a certain way, etc... Addiction most certainly ain't a disease! Can't find it under a microscope but in yo conscience. Depending on your addiction I know it can be hard to try and stop but it's very very hard if you've been doing it for such a long time. Addiction sucks it destroys families and lifes but it's all on that person if they wanna help themselves and those around them.
     
    bud and gab like this.
  12. howan

    howan not rude, just honest. Member

    Messages:
    80
    Likes:
    30
    Local Time:
    6:15 PM
    Well disease technically has to be medically proven and certified isn't it? I personally feel like addiction is pretty much just when you are obsessed with doing certain things that may/may not be harmful to yourself/others and if in case which it doesn't, it would definitely sound weird to categorize it under a disease. :)
     
    Matt and bud like this.
  13. Owzn

    Owzn Registered User Member

    Messages:
    61
    Likes:
    21
    Local Time:
    11:15 AM
    Boon:
  14. Owzn
  15. Addiction is a Disease, It is called chronic relapsing brain disease but in my eyes it does not start as an disease but after constant use it can become an disease because after constant use of an addictant if someone was to stop there body would be messing up because it has changed to fit the addiction i find it hard to explain. i decided to have a little look into the effects of stopping a drug immediately.

    "Withdrawal symptoms occur because your brain gets used to and adapts to a drug or alcohol being present. If you have been taking a drug or drinking alcohol regularly and suddenly stop the body has to get used to it not being around any more, and you will experience ‘withdrawal symptoms’. The type of symptoms and when they occur can differ depending on which drug you were taking."
    -http://www.headmeds.org.uk/general-advice/practical-advice-about-medicines/addiction-and-withdrawal
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2016
    bud likes this.
  16. Sheldon

    Sheldon Registered User Member

    Messages:
    14
    Likes:
    11
    Local Time:
    9:15 PM
    Addiction is a disease in the sense of what addiction causes in the brain. As Owzn quoted above, addiction causes the body to adapt to substances, environments, etc.

    Drug addiction is a very serious disease in that it is not an affliction solely of the mind. Using opiates as an example; a heroin addict who injects multiple times daily, not to escape reality or 'get high' but to stay 'normal' doesn't do so out of sheer choice. Use of opiates causes the brain to 'rewire' itself to promote dopamine (commonly associated with being the 'rewarding chemical') only for using heroin. Imagine waking up every day, unable to find enjoyment out of exercise, sexual activity, having a coffee or a cigarette. The only thing that makes you happy is heroin use. Now, combine that with the effects of opioid withdrawal. Very intense nausea, sickness, depression and hallucinations. Heroin withdrawal is described as utter hell, just watch Trainspotting. SPOILER ALERT: Sick Boy's method doesn't work.

    Opiates are just one example. Alcohol, tobacco, methamphetamine and other such stimulants do the same thing. Hell, even food can cause such patterns with addiction and the reward cycle.

    The sooner addiction is realized as being an actual disease that needs to be normalized within society, the sooner drug addicted peoples will be able to get better treatment. Moreover, treatment doesn't necessarily need to be replacement therapies. Opiate replacement therapies are by no means perfect. Methadone and buprenorphine are both utilized as replacements and both are still opioids. They are just legalized opiates created for replacement therapies. The brain is still in the same environment as a heroin user. Anecdotally, I know of a heroin user in my hometown who is homeless and every day walks to a pharmacy that opens at 6 AM for his methadone shot. Every day, day in day out he is still a slave to his addiction.

    Instead of replacement therapies, other countries are trialling and using various means of combatting addiction.
    Injection centers serve the community by reducing HIV & AIDS, as well as Hepatitis C and other diseases that are transmitted through sexual or blood-to-blood contact. They also provide great aid in terms of counselling, alternative replacement therapies, spiritual counselling and other provided healthcare options within the same environment.
    Providing drugs to drug addicts is a crazy idea to most. It took me a fair amount of reading to understand that this is actually a very reasonable option. Once you take away the term 'drug addicts' from drug addicted people, which is a dehumanizing term you realize that they are people with substance problems like many others with legalized substance problems. They can actually survive and become productive members of society while being provided the drugs that they use to stablize themselves. Heroin for heroin users, etc. These people have families, jobs and pay their taxes while costing their governments far less per person. Instead of healthcare provided and other options, they take their drug and off they go. This is also more likely to make them clean up. They aren't seen as sub-human beings due to their addiction, they are seen as human beings with a disease.
     
    bud likes this.
  17. Mistress

    Mistress murdered everybody Member

    Messages:
    493
    Likes:
    342
    Local Time:
    5:15 AM
    Boon:
  18. Mistress
  19. Snog:
  20. insanium
  21. why am i just seeing this, kinda mad i didnt notice this before
     
    Sheldon likes this.